We’re All to Blame: A Bahamian Culture of Systemic Corruption

1Corruption We are all to blame

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“The Bahamas: our home-our problem”

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It is now time for the advancement of a nationwide backed and government-sponsored Community-Based Participatory Research intervention into emotionally distraught and morally disengaged communities throughout the Bahamas. Community social ills in the Bahamas now require an ethnographic fieldwork approach; such an approach is necessary to resolve community problems by inquiring and facilitating each member’s diagnosis. Although regarded as a Christian nation, the Bahamas does not have a single, comprehensive, and coherent way of addressing ethical issues or dilemmas. Hence, we have seen an ad hoc approach to crime and other social problems. This must change. From afar, there seems to be disarray, we continue to be a society plagued with many lackadaisical followers and so few leaders. That is, many adults religiously point to their vicarious learning experiences as the scapegoat for all their questionable choices and poor judgment. In truth, as we scholars begin to contemplate on ways to change the moral fabric of our Bahamian community, this will not be possible unless we allow the affected peoples to tell their own stories and recommend their own solutions. We must begin and end with the peoples’ voice, we must only be guides and facilitators.

J. Archer

Whose Justice?

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I have seen the majority over the minority in democracy, gender over fairness in equality, and rich over poor in social class…the clamor for justice appears to be self-interested and instrumental… with an often disregard for justice, desire seems to be motivated by our pleasure over another’s pain. Arguably, the quest for diverse equality in many ways breeds new inequalities. As I see it, the problem intrinsic to the implementation of justice is that it has the unintended consequence of creating divides, a departure from its envisioned harmony. That is, in a community of people, we are often uncertain who are the losers in Justice, and the winners in injustice. Nevertheless, Justice was never meant to be a tool intentionally focused on the individual’s interest but designed to manage and protect a well-ordered society.

J. Archer

Unity- A Human Right

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“Diffusion of Democracy” is lauded as the path to global unification. The concept diffusion of democracy presupposes one nation superior to another across a spectrum of ethical systems (business, governance, care, finance, religion, social). The construction of power grants those deemed at its apex the privilege to espouse value-laden judgments on the inferior, although such dogma is nothing more than the privilege of the powerful. In a world guided by mistruths and intimidation, democracy can hardly unify the nations. Unity requires respect for nation sovereignty, cultural differences, and transparency in the ethics of global social justice. The collapse of systems must occur before they can ever unify.
J. Archer

The Long Road to Change

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I have had the personal experience of defending black history and future, after an intellectual discussion on justice and reparations with astute peers at a very high academic level, I feel many may be sympathetic for blacks but hardly empathetic. Although blacks grapple with institutional racism, the aging systems, and its members are comfortably set, with few incentives to change the trajectory of the status quo. I sat at the table of human diversity, as a representative, so many questions and a vague consensus on a solution.

The pace of the world quickened at the very thought of black freedom, nobody has looked back not since emancipation, a race to the top, looking back may slow [us] down. For many people the phrase “reparatory justice” sounds a lot like the claim “unequal distribution of resources”, in a world where equitable distribution does not mean “equal” division – it means “fair” division, where those who determine what is fair also determine what is equal, in violation of the separations of powers principle.

I am left pondering.

J. Archer

Noisey Market

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The cost owed to freedom is responsibility. Free speech is a right that has been and continues to be exploited. Today everyone is demanding their voice be heard at the harsh expense of nobody actually listening. The vibrant parts of society functions like a market, those spaces where the day to day people gather; Facebook, under the tree, Barber shops, Hair Salons and other markets. However, great ideas and great people have emerged from the markets, in those scenarios vendors and patrons alike stopped talking and they listened. Noise in this sense would be those inflammatory dogmatic statements, or opinions that are disjointed, lewd and fixated on obscenity. The noise in the market is literally just that, everyone talking nobody listening. Somehow, matters that require prudence and common-sense discussion is lost in the deafness of the market. In the 1930’s many riots occurred in the Caribbean due to the “noise in the market”, of course this noise was built around the desire for equality and justice which we have today. It is such a privilege that people, all people, are able to have unrestrictive dialogue and express freedom of opinions. Sadly, with such a privilege we sacrifice meaningful contributions on daily and current discourses simply to make a little noise in the markets.
J. Archer