Educating our Youth: Whose education?

educating-the-youth

What is the role of society in educating? What is the role of education in society?
According to American psychologist John Broadus Watson;
“Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed, and my own specified world to bring them up in and I’ll guarantee to take any one at random and train him to become any type of specialist I might select – doctor, lawyer, artist, merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and thief, regardless of his talents, penchants, tendencies, abilities, vocations and the race of his ancestors” (Watson, 1924, p. 104).
However,
According to English philosopher and physician John Locke, he wanted an education that in the very first place would teach children to work: to become useful and god-fearing people who would not be dependent on charity. Locke wanted this education to create a rationally thinking, morally dependable, socially capable person given to both adequate reflection and adequate action. Locke considered good morals and good manners more important than knowledge; and as far as knowledge was concerned, he stressed it should be selected not just because of some educational tradition, but rather for reasons of usability and practicality. Locke advocates for teaching that was more concrete than abstract, and that to some extent took into account the individual pupil’s temperament, interests, capabilities, and environment. He pointed out explicitly that no two children were the same, or that compelling children to learn when they didn’t want to might turn out to be ineffective. According to Locke, the student should learn his proper place in the social order: if possible without harsh punishments, but if necessary the hard way (Locke, 1693).
What is education?
Who is educated?
Who creates a value system that simultaneously differentiates, categorizes, elevates, and diminishes people inequitably… inevitably establishing the boundaries of human academic development?
They say the sky is the limit. Whose sky? Whose limit?

J. Archer

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